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What is 4K and UHD? 

4K is defined as a professional production and cinema standard, while UHD is a consumer display and broadcast standard. 

The term "4K" originally derives from the Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI), a consortium of motion picture studios that standardized a spec for the production and digital projection of 4K content. In this case, 4K is 4,096 by 2,160, and is exactly four times the previous standard for digital editing and projection (2K, or 2,048 by 1,080). 4K refers to the fact that the horizontal pixel count (4,096) is roughly four thousand. The 4K standard is not just a resolution, either: It also defines how 4K content is encoded. A DCI 4K stream is compressed using JPEG2000, can have a bitrate of up to 250Mbps, and employs 12-bit 4:4:4 color depth. 

 

Ultra High Definition, or UHD for short, is the next step up from what's called full HD, the official name for the display resolution of 1,920 by 1,080. UHD quadruples that resolution to 3,840 by 2,160. It's not the same as the 4K resolution made above — and yet almost every TV or monitor you see advertised as 4K is actually UHD. Sure, there are some panels out there that are 4,096 by 2,160, which adds up to an aspect ratio of 1.9:1. But the vast majority are 3,840 by 2,160, for a 1.78:1 aspect ratio.

 


 

Lightware has supported the highest 4096x2160@30Hz 4K , 3840x2160@30Hz UHD resolutions since 2013. Lightware also provides 4K extenders which can be used in point-to-point 4K transmission and also connected to MX series matrices at far end points.

 

Download our 4K white paper to learn more about 4K UHD technology and professional AV solutions.

 



   

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